Houston TX Veterinarian, Veterinary Clinic | Memorial-610 Hospital for Animals, Houston TX
 

Pet Health

Pet Health Photo

Health is the Cornerstone

PUPPY/KITTEN

Bringing home a new puppy or kitten is a special and exciting time for you and your family. It is only natural that you want the very best for your new pet. Sooner than you think, all sorts of questions will arise. What should I feed and how much? What about housebreaking and behavior? What do I do if he or she gets sick? When should my pet be vaccinated? We are here to help answer those questions and guide you through the process of having a new puppy or kitten.

We are dedicated to partnering with you to ensure a long, happy, healthy life for your new pet and are here to help you get your kitten or puppy off to a good start from the very beginning. Our initial kitten and puppy exams generally take a bit longer than traditional exams as they are filled with important information. We also want to allow plenty of time to answer any questions you may have concerning your new pet’s health, nutrition, and behavior. Most new kittens and puppies will have two veterinary visits typically about three weeks apart. Any booster vaccines needed beyond these first visits can usually be done as brief appointments made with our nursing staff. You can expect your first visit to include:

  • A comprehensive physical examination
  • Initial vaccinations or boosters as indicated
  • Testing for intestinal parasites and de-worming
  • Testing for Feline Leukemia and Feline Immunodeficiency Virus in kittens
  • Beginning heartworm preventive and parasite control
  • A discussion about spaying, neutering, and microchipping
  • Information about nutrition and optimal body condition
  • Information about behavior and what to expect or modify

  • ADULT

    Wellness examinations give your veterinarian an opportunity to minimize potential health risks through early detection and treatment and are essential for keeping your adult animal healthy. Dogs and cats age much faster than we do, so a disease can progress from initial onset to serious illness in a relatively short amount of time. For example, if your pet missed an annual exam two years in a row, it would be the equivalent of you not seeing a doctor or dentist for about 15 years! A thorough physical examination is recommended for most adult pets annually. Adult patients with chronic conditions, including those on long-term prescription medications, may need to be seen more frequently. Your pet’s annual exam will include:

  • A thorough physical exam (includes eyes, ears, nose, throat, coat, skin, heart, lungs, abdomen, genitals, lymph nodes, oral cavity, weight, GI, musculoskeletal, and central nervous system)
  • Personalized vaccinations based on your pet’s risk of disease exposure
  • Fecal examination to screen for intestinal parasites
  • Recommended veterinary diagnostic tests based on your pet’s breed, age, lifestyle, and overall health
  • A complete oral/dental exam
  • Recommendations for flea, tick, and heartworm control
  • An evaluation of your pet’s diet and nutritional health
  • Review of your pet’s current medications and discussion of any newly prescribed medications
  • Scan for microchip efficacy, position, and ease of detection
  • Evaluation of any new symptoms or behavioral changes

  •  SENIOR/GERIATRIC

    As our pets reach their senior years, it is natural to have some worries about the physical changes and health issues they may be facing. We all want our pets to have long and healthy lives, and the best way to achieve this goal is through preventive health care. The risk of age-related illness increases with age, so semi-annual exams are recommended for our senior patients. These exams generally take a bit longer than traditional exams to allow ample time to address any specific concerns you may have regarding new problems that have arisen since your pet’s last visit. Animals by nature are very good at hiding pain and illness, so it is important to be aware of subtle clues that may indicate an underlying problem. Pay attention to changes including stiffness, vision changes, decreased appetite, increased thirst, changes in bladder or bowel habits, decreased activity, and weight loss. If you notice these or any other changes, be sure to bring them to your veterinarian’s attention. Your pet’s senior wellness exam will include:

  • A thorough physical exam (includes eyes, ears, nose, throat, coat, skin, heart, lungs, abdomen, genitals, lymph nodes, oral cavity, weight, GI, musculoskeletal, and central nervous system)
  • Comprehensive lab work including a Complete Blood Count, Chemistries, Thyroid level, and Urinalysis
  • Personalized vaccinations based on your pet’s risk of disease exposure
  • Fecal examination to screen for intestinal parasites
  • A complete oral/dental exam
  • Recommendations for flea, tick, and heartworm control
  • An evaluation of your pet’s diet and nutritional health
  • Review of your pet’s current medications and discussion of any newly prescribed medications
  • Scan for microchip efficacy, position, and ease of detection
  • Evaluation of any new symptoms or behavioral changes
  •   

    Your Pet Site

    • Manage pet medical records
    • Order prescription refills
    • Schedule an appointment

    American Animal Hospital Association